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One of the hardest things for me is waiting. I don’t mean standing in line, but rather waiting for the long processes of life to play out. I feel like I naturally get things right away and I get the itch to sell for a small profit rather than hold-on long-term. I prefer to hit fast-forward and move on to the next scene because sometimes this scene is unfolding just too slow for my taste.

In Torah 72, Rebbe Nachman discusses two aspects of our evil side. The first aspect, which we are all too familiar with, can be described as a physical (blood boiling) urge to seek the unholy, whether it’s something that is prohibited to us or even a desire to release a negative emotion without limitation. But the second aspect of the yetzer hara is where the more spiritually aware might become ensnared.  This is the evil of דינים, judgements. Our job is to overcome and sweeten the judgements, so there is only absolute good. The Light of the Infinite One (einsof) exists where there is only good, and no judgements. In order to be absorbed in that highest place, we need to be free of any judgements.

To briefly explain judgements, we need to understand that there is no aspect of creation that stands outside of Hashem’s domain. This applies equally to good and bad. However, whereas the good is a direct outcome of Hashem’s Infinite Light manifesting in the world, the bad is a byproduct of hester panim, Hashem’s withholding His Light in response to our sins. Although the light doesn’t disappear entirely (for the world would cease to exist), its presence is greatly diminished. These tzimtzumim, or contractions of the Light, empower the Divine Attribute of Din (justice) to exact punishment. These ‘unholy dinim‘ are the root of all pain and suffering in the world.

A person may receive that which is destined to be his only after eliminating the impediments that had been holding it back from him. One of the ways of vanquishing the obstacles can be by forcing the issue. While this approach may hasten a person’s accomplishing his goal, it is not without cost. Alternatively, one can exercise perseverance and patience. This forbearance is also rooted in tzimtzumim and dinim. The difference is that these dinim remain attached to holiness. The restraint one exhibits by not forcing the issue has the power to mitigate the dinim and eliminate all obstacles at their root. Then he can receive that which he is meant to receive, all in its right time.

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